Scholarship opportunities

 Doctoral Scholarship: Urban Planning and Māori Development

Thursday, 8 March 2018

Description
This doctoral scholarship aims to promote the development of research in Māori development and urban planning in New Zealand. The aim of this project is to advance current planning frameworks through a better integration of Mātauranga Māori, and indigenous perspectives in urban design, planning, and in the processes of decision-making and community engagement. The project is part of a MBIE- funded programme entitled ‘Map-based tools for community and Rūnanga-led sustainable town planning in small and medium settlements in New Zealand’, which focuses the co-creation of tools to enable the integration of Māori perspectives and knowledge, and other forms of local knowledge, in local planning processes in the Waimakariri and Rotorua. This research programme is a collaboration between the Department of Geography and the Geospatial Research Institute at the University of Canterbury.
The doctoral project will be based in Christchurch. This PhD student is expected to be part of a team with other researchers to support the progress of the research project ‘Map-based tools for Community & Rūnanga-led sustainable town planning in small and medium settlements in New Zealand’, through the development of individual research for the doctoral dissertation within the topic of Māori development and town planning in New Zealand.
Please note that UC's Scholarships Office only advertises this scholarship is therefore unable to answer any enquiries. Any questions regarding the research project or PhD scholarship should be directed to Dr Rita Dionisio (rita.dionisio@canterbury.ac.nz). 
Eligibility
Strong background in either urban/town planning, urban design, landscape architecture, urban geography, Māori development and/or related disciplines to either master’s or honours level.

How to apply for this scholarship
Applicants please email your CV, including at least two academic referees, a statement of your research interests and your university transcripts to bicultural.planning.aotearoa@gmail.com before the 30th of April 2018.

 

Keywords
Postgraduate. Urban / town planning. Māori development

More information on the research project
The Department of Geography and the Geospatial Research Institute (GRI) Toi Hangarau at the University of Canterbury, have secured funding from New Zealand’s Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment for the project ‘Map-based tools for Community & Rūnanga-led sustainable town planning in small and medium settlements in New Zealand’.
Current urban and town planning processes in New Zealand present few ways to include local knowledge and bicultural views in the decisions affecting cities and towns. This project looks at developing new ways and tools to improve collaborative planning in New Zealand, by including local knowledge from communities and Rūnanga in town planning. These tools can be developed as maps, mobile applications, or websites, to provide local communities with opportunities to have a say about local needs, priorities, and concerns. The project focuses on two cases, the Waimakariri and Rotorua, in which the tools can be developed in relation to their specific contexts, and then can be replicated in other towns and cities across New Zealand facing similar town planning challenges. Many towns in New Zealand are exposed to natural hazards, and how communities and governments plan for post-disaster recovery coupled with population growth in the Waimakariri can provide relevant lessons across the country. The case of Rotorua is equally pertinent, providing insights to other towns in New Zealand, also growing rapidly in population, resulting in urban development pressures and fast-paced transformation affecting the lives of resident communities. For this, the research will identify how best to connect and communicate with Rūnanga and other local communities, to collaboratively define what the tools should look like, and how they should be created with, and for, communities. Once developed, these tools will provide communities with a platform to share and exchange information and knowledge about issues impacting their towns, informing and connecting to planning processes.
Research Aims and Questions
This research aims to create appropriate map-based tools to support communities to engage in, and lead local planning processes focusing on community recovery, regeneration and/or environmental management. To date, there are few initiatives that integrate bicultural approaches to town planning in New Zealand. We will work with, and for, Rūnanga and other local communities, in small and medium towns in New Zealand, to co-create these map-based engagement tools. For this, the research includes the development of an appropriate engagement methodology, to assess current town planning priorities with local communities, and identify how map-based tools can be co-created to address current planning needs.
This project will embed local Māori knowledge into the planning processes of two case studies, the Waimakariri and Rotorua.  In partnership with Te Ngāi Tūāhuriri (Waimakariri) and Ngāti Whakaue (Rotorua), and in collaboration with local councils and other community organisations, we will develop an in-depth understanding of local needs and perspectives in the context of the Waimakariri Recovery Plan, to develop an engagement methodology to co-create suitable map-based tools for the implementation of the plan. In Rotorua, we will also focus on assessing current town planning priorities with local communities, but with the primary aim of addressing rapid urban growth. This will focus on housing and transport issues, as well as other aspects of urban livability affecting this community that is undergoing rapid transformation.
Knowledge from these case studies will be transferable to other New Zealand settlements, facing recovery or rapid urban growth. It will help address key urban issues such as housing affordability, community resilience, community development, and better inclusion of all communities in town planning decision-making. This research aims to showcase co-creation as an inclusive planning tool while fostering community and Rūnanga-led decision-making in town planning processes.
This project aims to identify appropriate, and then deliver, map-based tools for communities and Rūnanga to participate, consult and engage in local planning decisions. These tools will be created to be biculturally appropriate in relation to specific local needs, such as community resilience, regeneration and/or environmental management. The research will initially be undertaken in the Waimakariri and Rotorua, two places currently experiencing development challenges. The main research questions are:
• What tools can support a better integration of Mātauranga and Tikanga in town planning?
• Which engagement methodologies are the most appropriate to collaborate and cooperate with Rūnanga and other resident communities?
• How can the tools and methods be evaluated, and improved to fit the needs of specific communities in collaboration with local governments?
Research Team


FIRST NAME

LAST NAME

ORGANISATION

ROLE

Rita

Dionisio

University of Canterbury

Principal Investigator

Simon

Kingham

University of Canterbury

Key Researcher

Angus

Macfarlane

University of Canterbury

Key Researcher

Hirini

Matunga

Lincoln University

Key Researcher

Maarit

Kahila-Tani

Aalto University, Mapita, Finland

Key Individual

TBA

-

University of Canterbury

Post-doctoral researcher

TBA

-

University of Canterbury

Ph.D. Student

TBA

-

University of Canterbury

Research Assistant (Technical)

TBA

-

University of Canterbury

Research Assistants (Engagement)

Any questions regarding the research project or PhD scholarship should be directed to Dr Rita Dionisio (rita.dionisio@canterbury.ac.nz).